Home design and interior decorating trends for 2020

Despite last year’s fears of a sluggish global economy and trade war with China, the 2020 real estate market went into high gear even before Spring… until the “disruption” (which I refuse to name in this post- we hear it plenty) and many are watching and waiting. Or using the downtime to focus on home design and family togetherness.

Home Design Trends:

  • If you’re thinking about a future kitchen renovation involving white cabinetry (40% of homeowners are still going this route), you might want to rethink it. If white is a personal preference (and you’re staying in your home) then design should satisfy the eye of the beholder. But should you plan to sell in the near future, it might interest you to know that wood materials like Oak are making a comeback. (I love white. Everything trendy eventually attempts a comeback. Like leg warmers, some should remain part of history.)
  • Transition your home design from overly minimalist to a more comfortable and inviting kitchen space by hanging artwork or using display or open cabinets to show off your favorite dishes. For color, consider muted blues and greys- OR go bold with the 2020 Pantone color of the year, Classic Blue. Audrey Morrone/Morrone Interiors located here in central Florida shows a lovely way to incorporate Classic Blue into a kitchen/dining space. Home Design Trends 2020
  • For stone counters, Quartz, virtually stain-free and highly hygienic, is here to stay. Granite is slightly less expensive but very porous. Quartz can be created to look like granite or marble by custom veining.  CambriaUSA produces gorgeous quartz counters- see photo below. Two less known counter materials include one made up of 75% recycled glass and white cement (EOS Surfaces), and the other is simple polished concrete (Wiedemann Werkstätten)

Home Design Trends 2020 Another local design company, Cabinetry Creations Inc does beautiful work for kitchens, baths, closets, outdoor spaces and all in-between. Here’s an Urban style kitchen from their portfolio:Urban Kitchen by CCI in Orlando, FL+

  • Two highly desired spaces for Millenial buyers: home office and gym. Trend for home offices in 2020 pairs handcrafted wooden desks and storage cabinets, plus choosing the right color. Cool tones help retain focus, but monochrome white or brown & beige remain popular. Add a hint of color to stimulate creativity. For the gym, Mansion Global suggests you keep it non-sterile. Start by choosing a space that has a window, glass wall or door (great for cardio machines) that opens to outside and use hardwood or laminate except for weight area which should be padded. Add some ceiling-mounted modern light fixtures and big wall mirrors to create dimension. Here’s a great example from Houzz (and judging from those Cypress trees, it’s likely somewhere on the Butler Chain of lakes). Home Gym Design Idea Orlando, FL
  • Front doors: I’m in love with the use of natural materials like distressed black steel, copper and stainless as well as the combination of interesting patterned wood and glass inserts. You’re bound to want one of these home designs featured by Freshhome.com.

Home Design Trends 2020

  • Flooring: Hardley a drastic change here, but processes to create more variety and customized appearances are on the rise. From varied patterns to fumed, bleached, blanched, or distressed and for those who want no part of wood, “distressed” concrete tile is gaining popularity and works especially well with industrial and contemporary styles. For the warmer rustic look, try barn door flooring- still a faux wood but looks like the real thing. The trend regardless of material is a luxury aged look. Another trend emerging from the past if you’re looking for something different? Vintage black & white tiles in bold graphic patterns. (photos L-R: Fumed by Great Floors, Distressed & Barn Wood both by Sebring Design Build and Graphic Pattern by Eric Cohler Design)

  Graphic tile floor, 2020 Home Design trend, Orlando, FL

Interior Decorating Trends:

  • In a Jan 2020 Upscalelivingmag.com article, Leila Amber has this advice: “Don’t allow your home to look trapped in 2010.” (uh oh) Amber urges us to move out of the past decade of neutral monochromatic colors (whites/greys) and replace with “bolder and more exciting brilliant monochromatic of cobalt blues, aubergines, and royal greens.” (Sounds fun and adventurous, but I’ll stick with neutrals)
  • Make 2010’s minimalist decor more interesting with bolder patterns. She references Lee Radziwill’s style (Jackie O’s sister)and affinity for using repeating floral patterns as example. Dramatic accessories might be a better option than changing colors. She lists tapestries for those who still prefer European luxury style or for the more modern and contemporary taste, black lined frames, geometric shaped metal trays, contemporary rugs and so on.   Home Design Trends 2020
  • Read the full article

According to a recent Forbes article, lots of NYC designers are tired of seeing “the same ‘ole” and their answer is to go uber-unique. One photo is captioned “A dark kitchen is the new white kitchen”. Another photo shows off monochromatic reds on walls and furniture, Warhol-like portraits and a gothic chandelier. (Crowley’s mancave?)  Another site states a brand new trend is “cannabis chic”.  I’m too uninterested to explore what that might mean.

Takeaway: interior decorating is like fashion- some years they run out of ideas and go with the opposite of fashionable, so you’re better off sticking with past-season selections you actually like. My personal and professional advice? Aim for Transitional style you’ll still like years down the road- and so will most prospective buyers should you decide to sell.

Featured photos:

  1. photo by Roberto Gonzalez for Orlando bespoke designer Audrey Morrone/Morrone Interiors
  2. Cambria Brittanica stone surfaces, photo by K. Michael Paul
  3. Doors trio images from left as published by Freshhome.com: 1) Michael Fullen Design 2) Hartman Baldwin and 3) Rocky Mountain Hardware
  4. photo from Knothome.com (article by Leila Amber, published by Upscalelivingmag.com)